Vita Jym

Vita Jym

Controlled Labs Orange Triad

Controlled Labs Orange Triad

Allmax ZMX2 Advanced

Allmax ZMX2 Advanced

Vita Jym

Starting at $42.95

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Vita Jym - 60 Tablets
$42.95

Jym Vita

JYM Supplement Science combines real science with best-in-class ingredients and precise doses to deliver unreal results. Vita JYM is my exclusive multivitamin/mineral supplement formulated to provide the micronutrients hard-training athletes need in the exact doses they need them. It’s precisely engineered to deliver exactly what you need to support performance, growth and overall well-being.

If you don’t pay much attention to the ingredients and doses in your multivitamin, it’s time to open your eyes. Most multivitamins are built on pixie-dusted blends of random micronutrients, and they often include ingredients that can actually hinder absorption. Vita JYM contains a specific blend of synergistic micronutrients to deliver and help you absorb critical vitamins and minerals in the doses and forms you need.

Most importantly, Vita JYM won’t compromise your muscle growth and performance like many multivitamins can. Yes, the multivitamin you’re using may actually limit muscle growth! Read below to learn why.

The Science of Vita JYM

Research shows that athletes and those who exercise intensely lose many critical vitamins and minerals from training, particularly B vitamins, vitamin C, chromium, selenium, iron and copper. This is due to a variety of factors, including the loss of minerals in sweat and urine, their increased use for energy production during workouts, and their increased use for recovery and protein synthesis after workouts. Therefore, it’s critical that you get at least the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) or Daily Value (DV) for most minerals, and get far more than these recommendations for most of the vitamins and specific minerals for optimal performance and physique changes.

I formulated Vita JYM to avoid the four common mistakes that undermine most multivitamin/mineral supplements. These fatal mistakes include:

1) Conflict of Interest

Most multivitamins sold today actually include minerals that you don’t want in a multi. These minerals can inhibit the uptake of important nutrients, like amino acids, as well as other critical minerals.

The first mineral you don’t want in your multi is zinc. Zinc can inhibit the uptake of amino acids! Since it’s important to take a multivitamin with a meal, such as breakfast, a multivitamin that includes zinc could interfere with your body’s ability to utilize the amino acids in the protein you consumed at breakfast. That could interfere with muscle growth and strength gains, which is the last thing that you want!

Zinc also interferes with copper uptake, and copper is something you do want in your multivitamin. You also want iron in a multi, and unfortunately zinc interferes with its absorption. As a result, I recommend taking zinc at night, without food, in your ZMA supplement.

Calcium is another big problem in multivitamin supplements. Calcium interferes with iron and manganese absorption. Unfortunately, calcium is in 99.99% of the multivitamins for sale.

Then there’s magnesium, which is also found in most multivitamins. It interferes with manganese and calcium absorption. Both calcium and magnesium should be completely absent from your multivitamin and they should be taken at a separate time of day.

Phosphorus is the fourth mineral you don’t want in your multi. The typical American diet is already rich in phosphorus. Having it in your multivitamin could actually raise phosphorus levels too high. This is problematic because high phosphorous can prevent the conversion of vitamin D to its active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, in the kidneys. Since this form is the most potent form of vitamin D and provides the majority of benefits, poor conversion can have negative consequences on bone health and vitamin D’s other key benefits, such as better muscle strength and higher testosterone levels.

2) Vitamins and Minerals That Are MIA

While many common multivitamins include minerals they shouldn’t, they also completely lack or under-serve other critical micronutrients. Not only are these multis under-dosed for the hard-training individual, they often aren’t even adequately dosed for the average couch potato.

One common vitamin on the MIA list is vitamin K. Recent research suggests that far more people are deficient in vitamin K than originally believed. Research suggests that supplementing with vitamin K2 alleviates the symptoms of vitamin K deficiency and provides a host of other health benefits. Vitamin K may help protect against heart disease and cancer, enhance your cognitive function, support your skin health, promote healthy testosterone production, and promote bone formation.

Another missing or under-dosed micronutrient in many multis is iodine, which is critical for maintaining healthy thyroid function. Since most of the earth’s iodine is found in oceans, iodine deficiency is an important health problem throughout the world. With the wrongful demonization of salt/sodium, few people salt their food today and many restaurants use far less salt in their dishes. The problem with this is that table salt is iodized to prevent iodine deficiencies. Research shows that diets that exclude iodized salt, fish and seaweed have been found to contain very little iodine. In fact, studies suggest that iodine intakes have declined in the U.S., Switzerland and New Zealand. If your multi doesn’t deliver iodine at 100% of the DV or RDA, it’s a problem.

Chromium is also absent or severely under-dosed in most multis. This is problematic because the average diet is low in chromium. You could take a separate chromium supplement, but chromium is actually best utilized as part of a multivitamin because uptake is enhanced when chromium is taken with vitamin C.

Copper is another missing or under-dosed mineral. Since higher intakes of zinc can lead to copper deficiency, and you should be certain to get 30 mg of zinc daily separate from your multivitamin, it is important to get an adequate dose of copper (about 3 mg).

The B vitamins are another problem. You will see them listed on most multivitamins, but the doses are often far too small to offer hard-training individuals any benefit. Any athlete or individual who trains hard should be getting 100 mg of most of the B vitamins, excluding the ones taken in mcg doses.

Other minerals that are also often grossly under-dosed in multis include selenium, molybdenum and manganese. These minerals and vitamins should be included at a dose that provides at least 100% of the DV or RDA for them.

3) Bad Form

Bad form isn’t just something you see in the gym; it’s also commonly seen on supplement labels. I’m referring to the specific form of supplements used. A major issue with most multis is that they use cheap, ineffective or even potentially dangerous forms of certain vitamins and minerals.

Consider vitamin A. Vitamin A is often provided in multivitamins as preformed vitamin A, or retinol, in the form of retinyl palmitate or retinyl acetate. These forms are rapidly absorbed but slowly cleared from the body, which can lead to toxicity and liver problems if too much is consumed.

Beta-carotene, on the other hand, is a much safer form of vitamin A. Beta-carotene is basically two vitamin A molecules bound end-to-end. The body only converts beta-carotene into active vitamin A when its vitamin A sources are low. To avoid possible vitamin A toxicity, your multivitamin should provide all of its vitamin A from beta-carotene. Sadly, few do.

If you’re lucky to find a multivitamin that provides some Vitamin K, there is a very good chance that it’s in the form of vitamin K1, phylloquinone, also known as phytonadione. Although this form of vitamin K is fine, it’s not necessary in a multivitamin since few people are vitamin K1 deficient. The other main form of vitamin K, vitamin K2, or menaquinone, is the more critical form to supplement with.

Of the menaquinones, menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and menaqionone-7 (MK-7) are the most critical to supplement with. While both vitamin K1 and K2 appear to be involved in blood clotting, K2 provides benefits that go far beyond that and include protection against heart disease and cancer, enhanced brain function, aiding skin health, boosting testosterone production, and promoting the formation of bone. Research suggests that vitamin K deficiencies may lower testosterone levels, and that supplementing with MK-4 can increase testosterone production.

Chromium is also often included in multivitamins in a cheap, less effective form like chromium chloride. Since this mineral tends to be low in athletes and those who train, you need a good dose of it a form that’s readily absorbed, such as chromium picolinate. Chromium picolinate is a combination of chromium and picolinic acid. The addition of the picolinic acid enhances the uptake of chromium.

4) Poor Absorption

Provided it has the proper forms of certain vitamins and minerals, taking a multivitamin with a meal will enhance the uptake of most of the micronutrients. However, generally speaking, most vitamins and minerals are not completely absorbed by the body. This means that you are basically flushing a good deal of vitamins and minerals down the toilet.

The best way to enhance the body’s uptake of the vitamins and minerals in a multi is to take them with 5 mg of BioPerine®. This patented piperine extract from black pepper has been proven in numerous studies to increase the absorption multiple vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Research shows that the 5 mg dose used in Vita JYM can increase vitamin B6 uptake by over 150%, beta-carotene uptake by over 61%, vitamin C uptake by over 52%, and selenium uptake by over 42%.

I formulated Vita JYM to ensure maximal uptake and utilization of the most critical vitamins and minerals hard-training individuals need. After all, I designed it for one of the hardest-training athletes I know – me! Now you can cover your micronutrient bases like I do so you can take your training and results to the next level.

 

More Information

Jym Vita Nutrition Information

Jym Vita Nutrition Information

 

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